Protection of Civilians: Challenges for peacekeeping and humanitarian organisations

A one-day seminar for researchers and practitioners

Thursday 26th January 2017 (10.00 to 16.30)

Venue: Kimmage Development Studies Centre, Kimmage Manor, Whitehall Road, Dublin D12 P5YP

Protection of civilians has been forced to the top of the agenda in numerous conflict situations and humanitarian crises. Peacekeeping missions are being given more and more responsibility for protection, but still struggle with the task. Meanwhile humanitarian agencies have to work in a complex environment with many different actors. Events in South Sudan, Central African Republic, the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, and Darfur have underlined the importance protection of civilians. This seminar will review developments, explore the constraints, and seek lessons and policy recommendations.

Topics include:

  • The changing mandate for Protection of Civilians (PoC)
  • Lessons from recent situations
  • Constraints faced by peace support operations
  • GBV and the gender aspects of PoC
  • PoC camps as a response
  • “Robust” peacekeeping
  • Engaging local actors in civilian protection

Speakers include:

  • Prof Siobhán Wills, Transitional Justice Institute, Ulster University
  • Prof Ray Murphy, Irish Centre for Human Rights, NUI Galway
  • Lt Col Robert Corbet, School Commandant, United Nations Training School Ireland (UNTSI)
  • Welmoet Wels, Independent Consultant
  • Colm Byrne, Humanitarian Manager, Oxfam Ireland
  • Maurice McQuillan, Catholic Relief Services
  • Dr Walt Kilroy, Dublin City University/Institute for International Conflict Resolution and Reconstruction

 

Register has now closed.

Organised by:

Institute for International Conflict Resolution and Reconstruction (Dublin City University) and Kimmage Development Studies Centre.IRC logo

The project is support by a grant from the Irish Research Council under its New Foundations scheme.

 

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